Thematic ETF specialist Rize ETF has launched the first sustainable food ETF and digital education ETF in Europe.

The Rize Sustainable Future of Food UCITS ETF (FOOD) and the Rize Education Tech and Digital Learning UCITS ETF (LERN) are listed on the London Stock Exchange, Deutsche Boerse and Borsa Italiana with total expense ratios (TERs) of 0.45%.

FOOD offers exposure to companies that are innovating across the food value chain to build more sustainable and fair food system for the planet.

It was developed with Tematica Research, a thematic equity research firm based in the US.

FOOD tracks the performance of the Foxberry Tematica Research Sustainable Future of Food index which is comprised of 44 stocks from both developed and emerging markets.

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LERN offers exposure to companies that are redefining how education is accessed, resourced and consumed around the world.

It was developed with HolonIQ, a global education market intelligence firm which forecasts expenditure on education and training from governments, parents and corporates to grow to $10trn by 2030.

LERN tracks the performance of the Foxberry HolonIQ Education Tech & Digital Learning index which is comprised of 35 stocks from both developed and emerging markets.

The launch of FOOD and LERN doubles Rize ETF’s offering to four having entered the European market in March with the launch of its cybersecurity and cannabis ETFs.

Stuart Forbes, co-founder of Rize ETF, commented: “We see expanding plant-based protein options, new technologies penetrating farming, aquaculture and supply-chains and changes in the packaging used to wrap our food, among many other things.

“As the food system revolutionises, we wanted to build an ETF that could capture the tailwinds arising from the wide array of supply side and demand side catalysts in the food sector.”

Rahul Bhushan (pictured), co-founder of Rize ETF, added: “In a sense, with the automation of jobs occurring across multiple industries, LERN is the antithesis to the robotics funds, because a huge number of people will need to re-skill as they are replaced by automation in the years to come.”